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Lighting

Jack Hoxley provides a thorough treatment of the various concepts behind modern lighting techniques. Beginning with an examination of the basic theory behind lighting and advancing through the most recent research in realtime rendering, this section is an excellent source of information and a prime resource on the topic.

  1. Foundation and theory
    1. What is lighting and why is it important
    2. Outline for this section of the book
    3. Prerequisite mathematics
    4. What are lighting models?
    5. Global and local illumination
    6. Emphasis on dynamic lighting
    7. BRDF’s and the rendering equation
    8. The Fresnel Term
    9. Where and when to compute lighting models
    10. Single or multi-pass rendering
    11. Sample Code
    12. References
  2. Direct Light Sources
    1. Attenuation
    2. Directional light sources
    3. Point light sources
    4. Spot light sources
    5. Area lights
    6. Performance
    7. References
  3. Techniques For Dynamic Per-Pixel Lighting
    1. Background
      1. Lighting resolution
      2. Choosing a resolution
    2. Creating the source data
    3. Storing the source data
    4. Moving from per-vertex to per-pixel
      1. Uncompressed storage
      2. Compress to 2-axis
      3. Compress to half-precision
      4. Compress to 8-bit integer
      5. Compute with the geometry shader
      6. Summary
    5. A framework for per-pixel lighting
    6. Simple normal mapping
    7. Parallax mapping with offset limiting
    8. Ray-traced
    9. Comparison of results
    10. References
  4. Phong and Blinn-Phong
    1. The Phong equation
    2. The Blinn-Phong equation
    3. Results
    4. References
  5. Cook-Torrance
    1. The Cook-Torrance Equation
      1. The geometric term
      2. The roughness term
      3. The Fresnel term
    2. Implementation
    3. Results
    4. References
  6. Oren-Nayar
    1. The Oren-Nayar Equation
    2. Implementation
    3. Results
    4. References
  7. Strauss
    1. Parameters to the Strauss model
    2. The Strauss Lighting Model
    3. Implementation
    4. Results
    5. References
  8. Ward
    1. Isotropic Equation
    2. Isotropic Implementation
    3. Anisotropic Equation
    4. Anisotropic Implementation
    5. Results
    6. References
  9. Ashikhmin-Shirley
    1. The equation
      1. The diffuse term
      2. The specular term
    2. The implementation
    3. Results
    4. References
  10. Comparison and Summary
    1. Global versus local illumination
    2. Light sources and the lighting environment
    3. Architecture
    4. Lighting resolution
    5. Types of materials
    6. Lighting models
    7. Performance